• Resource

    Celtic Fonts and Backgrounds

    From a rough analysis of my logs and the stats collected by Site Meter the most popular interior page of my site is the one on Celtic Fonts, and the most frequently entered search phrase, in terms of my Celtic Studies Resources is “Celtic backgrounds.” Now, I’m not positive, but I’m pretty sure the people searching on “Celtic backgrounds” are not seeking Celtic cultural history, but rather, web backgrounds. That said, I’ve created an annotated page of links to sites with Celtic inspired web art here.

  • Detail from Hans Memling Annunciatior showing a "book light"
    Conferences,  History,  Medieval manuscripts

    Lighting the Spark: The Medieval Itty-Bitty Book Light

    At the request of Janice Safran and Heather Blatt I’m posting this small detail from the Annunciation of 1465-75 produced by the workshop of Rogier van der Weyden in Brussels, Belgium — possibly by Hans Memling— and in the collections of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art. Sifran and Blatt are interested in hearing from anyone who’s seen a similar object in other images or heard one described in writing. They are presenting a paper on “Lighting the Spark: The Medieval Itty-Bitty Book Light” and are in hopes of locating similar images. They have already explored The Annunciation from the left wing of the Dijon Altarpiece (1393-99) by Melchior…

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  • Uncategorized

    Two More Medievalist Bloggers

    Thanks to the joys of referral logs, I can add S. Worthen of Owlfish, a medievalist graduate student, and Michael Drout, an Anglo-Saxonist and professor with a blog, to my list of medievalist bloggers.

  • Uncategorized

    Why Medievalists are Digital?

    Sasha Volokh, in response to an interesting post by Garrett on the preponderance of blogging lawyers, writes: Similarly, when I was first on the Internet about eight years ago and participating in or lurking on various medieval literature listservs, someone posted a theory on why medievalists were more wired than their counterparts who studied Shakespeare, the Romantics, and so on. The theory had to do with how e-mail and posting on listservs — anonymous forwards and the like — was similar to the way writing was treated in the Middle Ages and different from the more modern ideas of the fixed text and the authoritative author. All very interesting, but…

  • Outreach

    Sent from MetaFilter?

    If you’re coming from MetaFilter, or more specifically, MetaTalk, my main site, Celtic Studies Resources, emphasizes Celtic medieval studies. But there are a number of more general links on things medieval there, in the Resources section. There are also some good meta sites on things medieval. Labryinth is one. Orb is another. I’m rather fond of Websites Medievalists Should Know. There are a few others listed in my bio.

  • Uncategorized

    Other Medieval Blogs

    Yes, that’s right, I’m not the only one. There’s Traveling Shoes from Dr. H. D. Miller, and Ideofact (though he claims he’s not a real medievalist, he thinks and writes like one), and the self-described “Cranky Professor, who, any crankiness aside, is well worth the reading.

  • Uncategorized

    Birth of a Blog

    This is by way of an experiment for me; I’m new to blogging. My friend Paul’s iPaulo got me thinking about blogs as ways of creating communities, and that led me to think about blogs in instructional technology, serious and otherwise. I’ve had my digitalmedievalist site for years, but I find I’m not keeping it updated the way I’d like. So I thought I’d try blogging as a quick way to do small updates. For instance, I’d like to point out that the Dublin Institute, famous for physics and Irish scholarship, has put high quality scanned images of Lebor na hUidre/The Book of the Dun Cow on line. This is…