• Celtic Studies Books,  Outreach

    Roman and Celtic Olfactory History

    I’m working on my diss, and I notice that one of my citations lacks the publication date. I borrowed the book from a friend, and returned it long ago, so I decide to use Amazon to check the data. In the process I discover that there are, I kid you not, scratch and sniff history texts for kids. Like Roman Aromas, of which the publisher says: Young readers will learn that smells have played a powerful role in our history with these often funny tours back in time When the Romans arrived in Britain they soon showed the rampaging Celts the way to perfumed perfection. Poor old Celts–with their oils,…

  • Conferences

    Celtic Conferences

    The 24 Annual University of California Celtic Conference is this week, at UCLA. You can see the schedule here. Some of the papers from the 22nd conference are available here, in .pdf format. The 22nd (yes that’s right, UCLA was first) Harvard Celtic Colloquium is scheduled for Oct. 11, 12, and 13. The Vernam Hull speaker this year will be Professor John Waddell, head of the Dept. of Archaeology, NUI Galway.

  • Celtic Art & Archaeology

    Vellum beats Silicon

    Back in 1986, as a celebration of the 900th anniversary of the Domesday book, the census ordered by William the Bastard (that’s William the Conqueror to Sasenachs), Britain spent millions to compile text, images and, maps, audio and video recordings, as a snap shot of Britain, and stored them on laser discs as part of the Domesday Book project. They created discs that are almost unreadable today, not because of laser rot, but because of obsolete equipment. The irony of this, as the article points out, is that the medieval manuscript is quite readable today, if you know the language and the script. There’s even an expensive archive-quality facsimile, not…

  • Celtic Art & Archaeology,  Celtic Myth

    A Circle of Stones

    According to AP, by way of Yahoo, Professor Judith S. Young, Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has built a sun circle, a celestial computer along the lines of Stonehenge, or Avebury. I’ve taken pains to point out elsewhere that Stonehenge, like Avebury, or the passage tomb at Brugh Na Boine (that’s Newgrange, Ireland to you), wasn’t built by the Celts (its earliest stage predates their arrival in Britain by over a thousand years) but Stonehenge and other megalithic monuments are too deeply entrenched with things druidic and Celtic in the popular imagination to ever be disassociated. Stonehenge looms large in our imaginations—even though Averbury—the largest such circle in…

  • Celtic Art & Archaeology,  History

    Galations: The Biblical Celts

    Yes, that’s right, Galatia in Turkey. Those people in Paul’s New Testament Epistle to the Galations were Celts, from Gaul. These Continental Celts eventually arrived in Macedonia in 279 B.E., where they gathered under a tribal leader named Brennus. They intended to raid the rich temple of Delphi. Like their insular brethren, these Gauls were independent of thought, and the host split into two groups, one, under Brennus, marching south on Delphi: the other group, under Leonorius and Luterius, turned eastward and pillaged Thrace. They were joined by the small remnants of the army of Brennus, who was repulsed by the Greeks, and killed himself in despair. In 278 B.C.E.,…

  • Celtic Art & Archaeology,  History

    Celtic Tribal Maps

    I’ve noticed several sites with maps of Celtic tribes’ locations, like this one of the Celtic tribes of Britain, or this, tribes of Britain and the Continent, or even the tribes of Wales. There are also some specialized maps, like this one, of the Celtic Tribes and Caesar’s Campaigns in Gaul (58-50 BC) . If you look at the area the Celts covered, from Ireland all the way to Egypt, it’s less surprising that Galatia is Celtic.

  • Uncategorized

    Birth of a Blog

    This is by way of an experiment for me; I’m new to blogging. My friend Paul’s iPaulo got me thinking about blogs as ways of creating communities, and that led me to think about blogs in instructional technology, serious and otherwise. I’ve had my digitalmedievalist site for years, but I find I’m not keeping it updated the way I’d like. So I thought I’d try blogging as a quick way to do small updates. For instance, I’d like to point out that the Dublin Institute, famous for physics and Irish scholarship, has put high quality scanned images of Lebor na hUidre/The Book of the Dun Cow on line. This is…