• Medieval manuscripts

    Knight vs Snail

    Recently in the British Library’s excellent Medieval Manuscripts blog a curator mentioned a post medieval colleague noticing a marginal illustration showing a knight engaging in combat with a snail. This is not a rare motif in medieval mss. The Medieval Manuscripts post covers the bibliography regarding the motif, including a blog post by Carl Pyrdum on What’s So Funny about Knights and Snails? Various reasons for the popularity are proposed, but none are really convincing. I am therefore willing to propose another reason: Psalm 58. Here’s Psalm 58 in the Wycliffe translation. This is a psalm about divine vengeance, and the section I’m most interested in is this bit in…

  • Medieval Book of Hours image from Spinola Hours showing boaters making music for the May calendar image
    Calendar,  Medieval manuscripts,  Resource

    Getty Releases Images

    Last August the Getty Museum announced that it has made 4,600 pieces of art from the museum’s collection free to use. They’re focussing on “public domain” works of art, that means works that have endured beyond the limits of copy right, and users are free to  use, modify, and publish these works for any purpose. These are high-resolution, reproduction-quality images with embedded metadata, some over 100 megabytes in size. You can browse the images, or look for individual “download” links on the Getty Museum’s collection pages. Before the download actually begins, the Getty site asks simple questions about how you plan to use the images. There’s a well-written Getty Open Content Program FAQ.…

  • Etymons

    Pumpkin

    A few days ago I noticed that the local markets are already selling pumpkins for carving, and for eating (there are some pumpkin varieties that are known especially for sweet flesh, appropriate for pies and puddings and sweet breads). And I’ve seen the appearance of pumpkin lattes and pumpkin-inspired beers. In other words, yes we’re in the season known as autumn, and fast approaching harvest. A woman at the grocery store noticed me admiring the pumpkin display, and told me that they’re native to America, and that the word pumpkin is itself a native American word. I nodded politely, and didn’t correct her, but no, pumpkin is not a native…