• Literature,  Resource

    National Gallery John Donne Portrait Appeal

    There aren’t that many portraits of John Donne, and one of the best, the one you see here, has been in various private collections and less than accessible. This portrait was painted in Donne’s twenties, around the 1590s, the period when Jonson said “Donne wrote wrote all his best poetry,” the era in which we think most of the love poetry was written. The portrait was almost certainly done with Donne’s supervision. It’s Donne done as a melancholy lover, complete with disheveled and pricey expensive lace collars undone, and a Latin epigram. Donne is wearing an exceedingly romantic black floppy hat, and there’s a certain earnest directness to his gaze…

  • Conferences

    The First Annual Kalamazoo Bloggers’ Guild Meeting: What Say Ye?

    Dr. V and Ancrene Wiseass are beginning to plan the First Annual Kalamazoo Bloggers’ Guild Meeting, but they’re running into some logistic difficulties and would like your input on several matters. To wit: If you’re thinking of coming, please let them know in the comments thread here. If you’re thinking of bringing a friend, colleague, significant other, familiar, or minion, please let them know that as well. We’d like to get a sense of how large the gathering will be. We’ve been told that it would be best to meet early in the conference so’s we can keep meeting and greeting over the weekend. This means we should probably aim…

    Comments Off on The First Annual Kalamazoo Bloggers’ Guild Meeting: What Say Ye?
  • Music

    It’s not Medieval, but It is Irish: On Irish Traditonal Music

    For the last couple of days, I’ve been tormented by various people’s organizations’ ideas of what Irish music sounds like; mostly it’s been sort of like elevator music in dialect. If I’m lucky, it’s been Enya. Here are some alternatives. The Chieftains You can’t really talk about traditional Irish music without mentioning the Chieftains. They brought traditional musicians into the twentieth century, aiding in not just popularizing Irish music all over the world, to generations, but doing an enmourmousservice in preserving the tradition. The Best of the Chieftains is a compilation from three of the earlier, and best, of the Chieftains’ albums: The Chieftains 7, The Chieftains 8, and Boil…

    Comments Off on It’s not Medieval, but It is Irish: On Irish Traditonal Music
  • Celtic Art & Archaeology,  History

    Cocidius

    The BBC Web site is reporting the discovery of a 2000 year old carving of the British warrior-god Cocidius on Hadrian’s Wall, in Northumberland near Chester’s Fort. The language of the article, and of articles on the Web, implies that this “northern god,” as the BBC puts it, was Germanic. The carving, as you can sort of tell from the image, shows a figure with a shield in his outstretched left hand, and a sword or spear in his right; the sort of deity you’d expect Romans stationed in the cold hinterlands of Northumbria to favor. Cocidius is quite Celtic, and is in fact, British or Brythonic. His name contains…

  • Resource

    Dictionary of Anglo-Noman Online

    The Anglo-Norman Dictionary is now available on line, with no restrictions, (you don’t need a log in or proxy server) and at no charge. The Dictionary is searchable in a variety of ways, including words in the in context quotations, by headwords/lemmas, and via the English glosses to quotations. Entries, where appropriate, are linked to the associated and developing corpus of Anglo-Norman Source Texts. The Anglo-Norman Dictionary currently includes: A-F of the revised second edition G-Z of the first edition The new version of F, completed in 2005, is only available online, at the moment. A revision of G is in development and will be followed by H (in 2007).…

  • Conferences

    Digital Humanities Summer Institute June 19 to 23, 2006

    For the fifth summer, the University of Victoria is hosting a Summer Institute for Digital Humanities. A week long resideency program, the institute offers an opportunity to “discuss, to learn about, and to advance skills in new computing technologies influencing the work of those in the Arts, Humanities and Library communities.” A combination of seminars, lectures, and workshops, the Institute “brings together faculty, staff, and graduate student theorists, experimentalists, technologists, and administrators from different areas of the Arts, Humanities, Library and Archives communities and beyond to share ideas and methods, and to develop expertise in applying advanced technologies to activities that impact teaching, research, dissemination and preservation.” The curriculum has…

    Comments Off on Digital Humanities Summer Institute June 19 to 23, 2006
  • History

    Wel koude he knowe a draughte of Londoun ale

    The ThamesPilot project is a cooperative effort from libraries and museums along the Thames river. The British Library and the ThamesPilot project have combined resources to create an archive about the history and cultures of the Thames river. Thames Riverside Pubs is one of their efforts. An attractive, browseable presentation, it offers a history of ale drinking and brewing in England, a history of pubs, and inns, and hostelryes, especially along the Thames, from the Roman era to today. There’s lots of interesting historical information about pub culture, and about brewing. The tour is image-rich and a useful resource for medievalists teaching about Chaucer, or for pretty much any literary/historical…